Spoonflower dress_edited.jpg

Hi

My name is Gabriel and I love to sew, knit, and create. There's nothing better than making your own perfect outfit or giving a beautiful handmade gift. I document my creations on this blog - I hope you enjoy!

Navy Berlin Jacket

Navy Berlin Jacket

Berlin jacket side.jpg
Berlin Jacket line drawing.JPG

Winter is almost over here in Western Australia, but I’m still getting some wear out of my favourite winter make: a Berlin Jacket in navy wool. I’ve worn this jacket again and again over the last few months. It is so comfy and perfect over the top of my usual winter uniform of jeans, jumper, and scarf.

Pattern & Fabric

The pattern is by Tessuti Fabrics – one of my favourite Australian pattern designers. I decided to try it after being gifted a large piece of navy boiled wool by my mum. Luckily for me, mum is a recovering fabric hoarder so I recently inherited some gems!

You must use boiled wool (or another non-fraying type of fabric) for this pattern because all the edges are raw and exposed. This is an unusual feature but it actually looks great if you use the right fabric. Wool shrinks a lot so make sure you pre-wash your fabric properly. I pre-washed mine in the machine on the gentle wool cycle. I’ve since washed my jacket numerous times on the same setting without any problems.

 This pattern makes a feature of raw edges

This pattern makes a feature of raw edges

Berlin jacket back.jpg
Berlin Jacket front.jpg

Alterations

Hem

The main adjustment I made to my Berlin Jacket was to add a hem. The original pattern does not finish the bottom edge in any way. I decided to turn the edge up by 1.5 inches to give the bottom of the jacket a bit more weight. This adjustment actually made the jacket a better length for me and I’ll definitely do it again next time I make this pattern.

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Pockets

To compensate for the length I removed by turning up the hem, I shifted the pockets up by 1.5 inches. The pockets are quite low on the original pattern, so this adjustment worked well. In retrospect, I think the original pocket placement would have been too low for me because they are now at the perfect height.  

Underarm curve

To finish the Berlin Jacket, you sew up the sides and along the sleeves which have already been attached. In doing so, you have to pivot under the arm which forms a sharp curve. When I first tried on my finished jacket, this curve created a big pucker under each arm which looked awful! I clipped the seam allowance around each arm which completely fixed this issue. This is such a simple fix I’m surprised it isn’t in the pattern instructions.

 Clip this curve

Clip this curve

 The sleeve before clipping - eek!

The sleeve before clipping - eek!

 The sleeve after clipping

The sleeve after clipping

If I hadn’t been gifted some boiled wool, I probably would never have tried this pattern. Although I like the shape, I’m usually not a fan of raw edges or unlined jackets. However, I’m so glad I gave it a go because the finished jacket is very wearable. The large pockets are particularly handy, especially when your arms are usually full with a squirming toddler!

 My winter uniform

My winter uniform

A Diode beanie

A Diode beanie

Create your own geometric triple stitch design

Create your own geometric triple stitch design